Yolo County RCD logo
Donate
Search glass
 
 

What's New

Mobile Irrigation Lab

The Yolo County RCD is partnering with the RCD of Tehama County to bring the services of the Mobile Irrigation Lab to growers in Yolo County. This service provides on-site evaluations of agricultural irrigation systems to determine efficiency rating and application rate. The goal is to give growers an overall snapshot of their irrigation system, provide scheduling information and give recommendations to imiprove efficiency.

Flyer

Past News

On-Farm Clean Energy

NET ENERGY METERING AGGREGATION allows electrical customers greater flexibility in their siting and usage of renewable energy facilities. It can significantly reduce your electricity costs and make a renewable energy installation more economical.

This new feature of California’s Net Energy Metering program was added early in 2014 through the passage of Senate Bill
594 (Wolk) and the advocacy of CalCAN and other agriculture representatives.

For more information visit CalCAN

 

Healthy Soils, Quality Food

Scott Park, of Park Farming, has discovered the connection between healthy soils, a healthy environment and high-quality

products on his Sutter County, California farm. That connection benefits both his operation and the local cannery that

purchases his processing tomato product. https://www.youtube.com/user/NRCSCalifornia

 

Conservation Agriculture Videos Featuring Yolo County Farmers

The second segment of the Conservation Agriculture Systems Innovation (CASI) six-part video documentary is on the CASI website, http://CASI.ucanr.edu. California farmers have tended to adopt “clean cultivation” systems, but research has shown that maintenance of residues from the previous crop or a winter cover crop helps improve soil and reduces evaporation from the surface.

 

Tuleyome Tales: Partnership Helps Eradicate Invasive Grass

Ravenna Grass

Ravenna grass lines the edge of Cache Creek. Courtesy photo

By Victoria Brandon

A remarkable partnership project recently made great strides in eradicating a potentially devastating infestation of Ravenna grass (Saccharum ravennae) from some 70 miles of Cache Creek in Lake and Yolo counties. This invasive weed, which was deliberately introduced to California as an ornamental and has been described as “pampas grass on steroids,” could profoundly degrade riparian areas throughout the region if not controlled, and control is particularly difficult because so many of the plants are found in steep, inaccessible terrain deep in the Cache Creek Wilderness.

The control project was sponsored by the tri-county Cache Creek Watershed Forum stakeholder group, with primary management responsibility shared by the East Lake and Yolo County Resource Conservation Districts and Bureau of Land Management.

[ Read the complete article here on the Davis Enterprise Website]